NEW YORK – Fox News host Megyn Kelly posed a simple question on her Tuesday program: Why on earth would anyone want to teach children that convicted cop killer Mumia Abu-Jamal “is in any way like Martin Luther King?”

Kelly was asking the question in response to EAGnews reports that labor unions in California are pressuring the Oakland Unified School District to reinstate a series of lessons that teaches students that Abu-Jamal’s views are similar to those of King.

For answers, Kelly interviewed Johanna Fernandez, a coordinator for the “Campaign to Bring Mumia Home.”

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After several minutes of rehashing the facts of Abu-Jamal’s case, Fernandez finally answered Kelly’s original question: Why should any student “hear this man compared in any serious tone to Dr. Martin Luther King, who was against violence?”

Fernandez’s answer was revealing:

Well, you know what, Miss Kelly? I think that Americans don’t really know who Martin Luther King was. By the end of his life, Martin Luther King said at the Riverside Church in 1967 that the United States is the biggest purveyor of violence in the world.

He also said in his “I Have a Dream” speech that he could not stand by, uh, before the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. Essentially, by the end of his life, Martin Luther King – like Mumia Abu-Jamal – was a radical.

So, according to Fernandez, Abu-Jamal – who was convicted of shooting Philadelphia police officer Daniel Faulkner five times, including once in the face – was simply picking up where King left off.

That, of course, requires Americans to forget King’s many denunciations of evil, including this beloved quote: “Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.”

The full answer is that left-wing, anti-American radicals are unhappy that Martin Luther King has been embraced by mainstream Americans and they want to reclaim the civil rights leader as one of their own.

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Predictably, Fernandez is a history professor – at Baruch College in New York – which means she spends her days indoctrinating the next generation with revisionist, anti-American history.

But don’t take our word that Abu-Jamal’s followers are radical lunatics. Just check out the lyrics of “Never a Prisoner (Free Mumia),” a rap song that’s posted on the “Campaign to Bring Mumia Home” website. (The lyrics are taken from BeatKnowledge.org.)

You can lock me down but I will never be your prisoner

Victims are the ones that just obey and just give it up

Even in this world we enslaved like some prisoners

A freedom fighter fights ‘til the world listen up

 

Police terrorism, television showing fiction

Officer shot, them attorneys want convictions

Silencing the movements that stood up for liberation

Scared of self-defense and people’s self-determination

 

Terrified witnesses, forced cooperation

Thirty long years behind the walls of these racists

Hero to the youth and everyone for revolution

We need a million Mumias on the streets as a solution

 

Take over the media, tell the story to the people

Decolonise the streets til the cops are illegal

The world is my cell and ain’t nobody come and visit me

Went to they schools but they ain’t teaching us the history

 

Live from death row and I hope the world is hearing this

Malcolm in my dreams and Fidel making appearances

Salvador Allende was about popular unity

Freedom for Mumia Abu-Jamal and my community

 

You can lock me down but I will never be your prisoner

Victims are the ones that just obey and just give it up

Even in this world we enslaved like some prisoners

A freedom fighter fights til the world listen up

 

Hear the screams of the people, millions for Mumia

We marched in 97, no fear we still here

Years later, more hearings, more appeals

They still trying to have an innocent man killed

 

Or locked up in a cage for the rest of his days

To suppress the power of putting a pen to a page

In the age of information, really informing us

Despite incarceration, a people’s journalist

Voice of the voiceless can’t never be silenced

Exposing the injustice of systemic state violence

They lie, they steal, they rob, they kill

Yet we the ones targeted and thrown in jail

 

Thirty years plus in chains and cuffs

Now what we gone do, get on that bus

To Illadelph, heed the call, free ‘em all

And libertad for Mumia Abu-Jamal