SNOQUALMIE, Wash. – Two Washington elementary students are learning an eye-opening lesson about civics after they discovered a man viewing pornography on a computer at their local public library.

Alyx Barlament and Ann Kaufman, both 11 years old, were doing their homework at a King County public library when they inadvertently came across a man viewing naked woman on a library computer as they went from their study room to the restroom, Fox reports.

Barlament reported what she saw to the librarian, who asked whether the images were of women or children. When Barlament confirmed the images were not children, the librarian simply shrugged her shoulders.

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“It was a little freaky cause I have never really seen that before,” Alyx told Fox. “I was shocked because she goes, well, it’s legal – but if it’s children it’s not legal.”

“When I hear that this guy is in his rights, it blew my mind,” said Alyx’s mother Meg, who drove to the library to discuss the incident after her daughter called.

“I’m like, well, what about the kids’ rights?”

Officials with the King County Library System told Fox materials protected under the First Amendment are not censored on library computers, but default settings restrict content and users must request permission to remove the filter.

The central and highly visible location of the public computers typically discourages people from perusing porn, they said.

Meg believes that’s not good enough, and launched a Facebook group in an effort to force county officials to find a way to prevent young children from inadvertently viewing porn at the library.

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Many who joined and commented on her page, “Stop Pornography in Snoqualmie Ridge Library and All Public Places,” relayed similar stories and offered their support to take action.

“This whole story makes me sick. I have two daughters and we go to the library a lot, and the fact that there could be men or women there watching pornography in their presence and getting all horned out for sex around them infuriates me, as it does many parents here!” Kristin Bassett posted.

“If this is a free speech issue (I agree it’s a public decency and safety issue) and the library wants to take a stand on protecting ‘free speech,’ then it needs to stop promoting itself as a resource for families,” Kirsty Maginness wrote.

“Stop doing story time and encouraging parents to drop their kids off for after school study programs. If it’s buyer beware as the head librarian implied ‘it’s a public space and not our job to keep your children safe,’ then put up signs outside … warning that they allow the viewing of porn and welcome the people who watch it in the library as equally as welcome as the kids at story time.”

Joe Stone Sr. believes those viewing porn at the library may be violating the law.

“This is a much larger issue than King County,” he wrote. “The very same thing came up in Sultan this last week …

“This has nothing to do with free speech and everything to do with public decency. Washington law (RCW 9A.88.010(1)) states that indecent exposure is, ‘…any open and obscene exposure of his or her person OR THE PERSON OF ANOTHER, knowing that such conduct is likely to cause reasonable affront or alarm.’

“In my opinion, this law applies in this situation.”