A teacher in San Jose, California’s East Side Union High School District was suspended after he appeared topless during an online class last Friday.

Parent Elizabeth Alvia told The Mercury News her daughter was disturbed when her teacher was without a shirt on the second day of her freshman math class at Silver Creek High School, especially since it was a clear violation of the dress code he outlined days earlier.

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“She started feeling uncomfortable,” Avila said. “She couldn’t concentrate on the topic because all she was seeing was this old man on camera in her bedroom.”

The daughter took a screenshot of the session and forwarded it to Alvia, who confronted school officials about the situation.

So upset right now my daughter called me to say ask if it was ok for teachers to be naked on zoom I’m like WTF! She’s…

Posted by Elizabeth Avila on Friday, August 14, 2020

“He seemed really awkward and kind of gave me like a weird vibe,” 13-year-old student Makaylah Herrera-Alvia told ABC7 News. “And when he was using the camera, it was all shaking around and like, moving everywhere.”

Elizabeth Alvia identified the teacher Richard Cabral. ABC7 reports finding “pornographic interests” on Cabral’s public Facebook page.

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Superintendent Chris Funk confirmed the man in the image appeared to be a district employee, but declined to discuss the matter further. He also declined to identify the employee, the News reports.

“I will say that the behavior is unacceptable, unprofessional and violates several district policies,” Superintendent Chris Funk told the news site.

“This situation is under investigation,” he said. “In situations like this, an employee is immediately placed on administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation.”

The News noted temperatures topped last year’s record high of 98 degrees in San Diego on Friday, reaching 103 degrees, and the teacher appeared to be outside during the online session.

Regardless, Alvia contends it seems like “common sense” and basic etiquette to appear fully dressed.

“Be professional,” she said. “Put a shirt on.”

The San Jose mother said she believes the issue is about more than a shirt.

“I was just glad that my daughter realized, ‘Hey, this isn’t right’ and said something,” Avila said.

“This should be one of those zero tolerance-type of things,” she continued. “He needs to be out. If he thinks this is OK, what more is going to happen later if we let it slide?”